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Outdoor Gear Recommendations

There's no such thing as bad weather, only inappropriate clothing. -Sir Ranulph Fiennes

Since we go outside every day regardless of the weather good clothing options are a must. Here are some of our favorites:

The best cold weather mittens are made by Stonz. They are especially good for young infants. We would prefer you purchase these for your children, as they are the warmest and stay dry longer than any other we've found.  They make larger ones with thumbs for older children too. 



These are the BEST waterproof mittens! They stay on, they are warm, and they actually are waterproof. You can buy them on amazon. All clothing made by Abeko is high quality, we really love their stuff. For cold, rainy days these are an absolute must. 






Another company we really like is Oakiwear. We even have a special school discount (15%), just enter natureschool at check out. This trail suit is a really great option and comes in sizes 12 months - 8/9!






Polarn O. Pyret makes some tough rain gear as well. Their clothing is pretty stylish too. 









Molehill Mountain makes some really great options as well. This rain suit comes as small as 3-6 months. If you can't find it on their website you usually can on amazon.




If you're interested in trading, sharing, and reusing check out Yerdle, it's a fantastic company dedicated to those ideas!

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